Nuremberg: Building The Führer Myth

Heinrich Hoffmann, Hitlers photographer, once said “Der Fotograf bildet ab, sonst nichts.” (The photographer depicts, nothing else.) This was his argument for turning a 10 year prison conviction to only 4 years.
Albert Speer, Hitlers architect and later Reich Minister for Armaments and Ammunition, was convicted to only 20 years of prison while other leading Nazis of his rank and with very similar collections of crimes against humanity were sentenced to death.
Leni Riefenstahl, Hitlers infamous director, wrote: „[…] wo liegt denn meine Schuld? Sagen Sie mir doch das. Ich habe keine Atombomben geworfen, ich habe niemanden verleugnet. Wo liegt denn meine Schuld? (Where is my fault? Tell me that. I didn’t throw any atom bombs, I didn’t deny anyone. Where is my fault?

Together with Göbbels as Reich Minister of Propaganda and many others creatives, they created the myth around Hitler and the Nazis. Their grandeur and elevation. They depicted the führer as a Messias and the SS as saviors from evil. But their professions deal with visual aspects and they have been and still are underestimated in their effects.
Is design able to create a monster? As you can see in this very distinct examples, it sure is.

The Kongresshalle

A never finished building to host more than 50.000 people. With a planned height of 70 meters and a diameter of 170 meters the biggest still existing of the Nazi buildings.

The Zeppelintribüne

from where the Reichsparteitag happened and Hitler held his infamous speeches.

A Trip To Alsace: Beautiful Strasbourg and a little throwback to the past

We have been to Strasbourg before: My brother was just born and I myself have been 4 years old. My Mum at the time bought a leather handbag from a street vendor which was very smelly. We called it “the dog” and it had its place on the balcony for many years to come.

At the bottom of this post you will find some old pictures from Strasbourg my Dad made more than 40 yrs. ago.

At the time we went onto the roof of the famous cathedral but this time (Corona and I don’t know) the cathedral was closed over noon and we haven’t had the chance to see it again from the inside. But we went into another, very beautiful church – Saint-Pierre-le-Jeune-protestant – which is really a gem and worth to go.

Eglise Saint-Pierre-le-Jeune protestant

A little throwback to the past

The last picture I remembered to have seen in our family album. I made my mum repeat the pose from memory. Not too bad! And she doesn’t look at all like she is more than 40 yrs older than on the first picture!

A Trip To Alsace: Wissembourg, Hagenau And In Between

Mum, Pavlov and I have been to Alsace for some days and we saw a lot of timbered houses and bought and ate many different cheeses. On our first day we took a trip to some smaller but very picturesque towns. The weather was very variable and we had to pull out our raincoats several times.

A New Home For Refugees In 1947: The Eiermann Houses in Hettingen

Some years ago I visited an exhibition in the Bauhaus Archive in Berlin and only there I became aware that famous architect Egon Eiermann not only built part of a hotel in my hometown Buchen im Odenwald, but also several settlements for post-war refugees in 1947.
In 1946 Magnani, a priest from Hettingen, and Egon Eiermann made plans to build houses for the numerous refugees coming from the East to Baden. The settlers were strictly selected by ethical criteria (“no people caught with lies, theft or adultery”) – and had to build the houses mostly on their own.
Today it is possible to visit one of the simple houses which perfectly shows the different stadiums of occupancy – for example by not (always) recreating the original parts, but by leaving 40s, 60s and 80s taste of the residents shine through.

We’ve been lucky to have a guided tour by one of the former students of Eiermann. And I strongly recommend a visit for every friend of modern architecture.
Please look for opening hours and more history (German language) on the website.

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Other Eiermann houses in Hettingen and Buchen today

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Berlin Day Hike: A Rainy February Sunday

One of those days. When you stray around in your city – necessary sometimes, to get a feeling of belonging and full of surprising discoveries. When I came here a long time ago, the historical Moltkebrücke (the bridge with the lions you can see below) was a solitary building in the middle of nowhere. And while there are some new, quite impressive corporate and private buildings, their aesthetic expression seams meaningless and empty compared to the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (Kongresshalle).
My Dad would have had his 76 birthday today.

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Wild Berlin

Sometimes, on a walk through the city, you see more animals than in the forest. For example a grey heron 🙂

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