Berlin Night Hike: Empty Covid City

I started taking walks at night sometimes on my own, sometimes with a friend to move my tired home-office legs. You see some dog walkers around but even Unter den Linden and Brandenburger Tor is empty. Nobody is out there and it’s like in a movie where you wake up and suddenly you become aware that you are the only person around.

A New Home For Refugees In 1947: The Eiermann Houses in Hettingen

Some years ago I visited an exhibition in the Bauhaus Archive in Berlin and only there I became aware that famous architect Egon Eiermann not only built part of a hotel in my hometown Buchen im Odenwald, but also several settlements for post-war refugees in 1947.
In 1946 Magnani, a priest from Hettingen, and Egon Eiermann made plans to build houses for the numerous refugees coming from the East to Baden. The settlers were strictly selected by ethical criteria (“no people caught with lies, theft or adultery”) – and had to build the houses mostly on their own.
Today it is possible to visit one of the simple houses which perfectly shows the different stadiums of occupancy – for example by not (always) recreating the original parts, but by leaving 40s, 60s and 80s taste of the residents shine through.

We’ve been lucky to have a guided tour by one of the former students of Eiermann. And I strongly recommend a visit for every friend of modern architecture.
Please look for opening hours and more history (German language) on the website.

Egon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8849Egon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8838DSC_8836DSC_8834DSC_8831DSC_8846Egon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8828DSC_8843Egon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8853Egon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8842Egon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann Hettingen

 

Other Eiermann houses in Hettingen and Buchen today

Egon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8910Egon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8919Egon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenEgon Eiermann HettingenDSC_8923Egon Eiermann Hettingen

Berlin Day Hike: A Rainy February Sunday

One of those days. When you stray around in your city – necessary sometimes, to get a feeling of belonging and full of surprising discoveries. When I came here a long time ago, the historical Moltkebrücke (the bridge with the lions you can see below) was a solitary building in the middle of nowhere. And while there are some new, quite impressive corporate and private buildings, their aesthetic expression seams meaningless and empty compared to the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (Kongresshalle).
My Dad would have had his 76 birthday today.

DSC_3323

DSC_3410

DSC_3404

DSC_3345

DSC_3369

DSC_3449

DSC_3388

DSC_3429

DSC_3442

DSC_3465

DSC_3485

DSC_3511

DSC_3490

DSC_3516

DSC_3525

DSC_3522

DSC_3532

DSC_3569

DSC_3545

DSC_3579

DSC_3598

DSC_3605

Wild Berlin

Sometimes, on a walk through the city, you see more animals than in the forest. For example a grey heron 🙂

DSC_0422DSC_0371DSC_0425DSC_0388DSC_0439DSC_0445DSC_0451DSC_0406DSC_0457DSC_0540DSC_0548DSC_0489DSC_0501DSC_0549DSC_0344DSC_0358DSC_0514

Odenwald Hike: Impressions Of The Middle Ages At Hornberg Castle

The castle of Hornberg was first built in the 11th century. Germanys most famous knight, Götz von Berlichingen lived there for 45 years and the winery inside the castle is said to be the second eldest in the whole world.

DSC_0981DSC_0988DSC_1123DSC_1001DSC_1167DSC_1161DSC_1151DSC_1172DSC_1149DSC_1014DSC_1179DSC_1092DSC_1065DSC_1109DSC_1034DSC_1131DSC_1081DSC_1147DSC_1031DSC_1013DSC_0975DSC_1004DSC_1077