Scottish Highlands: Drumnadrochit And Urquhart Castle

We went to see Urquhart Castle this day and walked down to Drumnadrochit afterwards. The castle is a very well visited spot overrun by families, busses and instagrammers. The castles history is well explained by a short movie in the movie theater. But the sensation of the movie is the curtains opening at the end of it with a view on the real castle in bright sunshine. With some imagination you can see, how the people lived there.

Scottish Holidays: Arriving in Edinburgh

We planned this holidays long before Covid and finally we did it. We came together – eight people from three different cities – and met in Glenelg, just opposite to the Isle of Skye in a house with phantastic views – all of which Nicky organized meticulously. We first met in Edinburgh to drive to Glenelg from there.

Tour de Oderland

A very special guided tour brought us to some different initiatives in eastern Brandenburg, where we learned, how people from the city and from the villages live and work together on the countrysite and engage actively in village live. I was most impressed by the story of Trebnitz.

Hey, Bro!

My brother Daniel is mentally handicapped and lives is an institution not so far from where my Mom lives. He comes home from time to time and my Mom frequently visits him. The institution is located on the border of a forest and there are plenty of possibilities to have great times outdoors. We had a very nice afternoon with ice cream and a lot of lazy lying around in the sun.

Above: Hilda Wacker geb Mühlig, Joseph Löhr Mitte: Paula Wacker, Lina Wacker Wacker geb. Löhr, Hans Wacker, Alois Wacker, Hannelore Wacker Unten: Renate, Hilde, Maria

A Journey Into Memory

Today, eight years ago, my Dad died. Since some years, my Mum and I take the day off and do something nice and meaningful together. We decided, to visit the village where my Mum grew up and where I spend a lot of weekends and holidays of my childhood.

My Great Great Grandpa once build a fabulous house there in the Badgasse in Berolzheim, Baden Württemberg. Nothing huge and pompous, but three floors made of red sandstone, hard work, laughter and love. It stood there for two World Wars and was always full of children and adults. My Grandpa died in 1986 and since then my Grandma was the last person living there. In 2008 – she was already 90 years old – she still heated her rooms with a wooden stove in the kitchen. But the house risked to collapse and so my Grandma moved to an assisted living home. All the daughters already lived somewhere else and so the house was sold to a neighbor who demolished the dilapidated building and put up a garage instead.
My Grandma died in 2014 at 95.

Those are some pictures from the 50s to the 80s showing members of the family on the steps in front of the house.

I haven’t been to Berolzheim since more than 12 years because I didn’t feel I could bear the sight of the non existing house – the place of some of my dearest childhood memories – being replaced by a garage. But today I felt, I go seeing it. I frequently feel, that my attachment to “things” is quite tight compared to others and when I talk to my Mom, I know, that she feels just the same. It is – like if the things are gone – the memories are gone, too. I don’t want to attach myself to things. I wanted to feel, that those memories won’t be lost, just because the house has gone. And they aren’t.
Just yesterday I read the following: “Jeder Mensch sucht nach Halt. Dabei liegt der einzige Halt im Loslassen.” (Hape Kerkeling). I would translate it like that:


Everyone is looking for something to hold on to. But the only possibility to find something to hold on to, is to let go.

And in those times of change, there are things that will go and others that will come. And some old things have to go to make space for new things. And all of that is normal and good and maybe will even become much better than before. Who knows? Maybe it was a possibility for a good change in the life of someone?

I’m sad to see it gone. But is is still engraved in the corner of happy memories in my heart.

The place where the house once was and the village: