Odenwald Hike: Along Elz River With A Friend

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Odenwald Hike: Main River And Wertheim From Above

The castle of Wertheim overviews the junction between Main river and Tauber river and is one of the biggest stone castles in Germany. First built in the 12th century it hosts a restaurant, a gallery and a museum today. (More info)

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Odenwald Hike: Through The Forest To Märzenbrünnle

I didn’t really find something meaningful on the little chapel at Märzenbrünnlein in Walldürn besides that a butcher named Knörzer built it in the name of the Dolorous Virgin. There is a historic way of the cross in the forest and the place is said to be haunted. A lot of people from the village have seen a “white lady” over there.

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A New Home For Refugees In 1947: The Eiermann Houses in Hettingen

Some years ago I visited an exhibition in the Bauhaus Archive in Berlin and only there I became aware that famous architect Egon Eiermann not only built part of a hotel in my hometown Buchen im Odenwald, but also several settlements for post-war refugees in 1947.
In 1946 Magnani, a priest from Hettingen, and Egon Eiermann made plans to build houses for the numerous refugees coming from the East to Baden. The settlers were strictly selected by ethical criteria (“no people caught with lies, theft or adultery”) – and had to build the houses mostly on their own.
Today it is possible to visit one of the simple houses which perfectly shows the different stadiums of occupancy – for example by not (always) recreating the original parts, but by leaving 40s, 60s and 80s taste of the residents shine through.

We’ve been lucky to have a guided tour by one of the former students of Eiermann. And I strongly recommend a visit for every friend of modern architecture.
Please look for opening hours and more history (German language) on the website.

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Other Eiermann houses in Hettingen and Buchen today

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The Garden in June

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The japonese cedar is growing.

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The owls are no babies anymore.

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A tiny spider nest.

 

Road Trip From Berlin: The Castle Of Fürst Pückler

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The bridge over Neisse river to Poland unfortunately was closed because of corona virus. The park continues over there.

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Glashütte

On our way we visited the village of Glashütte because we thought this would be THE Glashütte, where the watches are manufactured. That isn’t the case. A quite pretty village anyway. But very touristic also. We didn’t stay for long.

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Berlin Day Hike: A Very Early Morning Hike Around Görlsdorf

We woke up early after we burned the virus. We wanted to take a little walk with this awesome weather and light but at the end we did 10km before breakfast. Which was very, very good afterwards.

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Burn the Virus

On a nice beginning of summer weekend, we met on the countryside to finally eradicate the corona virus from earth. Once and for all. At least in our dreams :-).

Everything started smoothly with a sunny walk through the fields.

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But how to burn a virus? We first must have it. And as our intent was highly symbolic, we had to create symbols that could be burnt.

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The evening came and our master of ceremonies came in form of ancient Indian wisdom to bring light to those dark times.

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Our job is done. May the virus Rest In Peace.